Brussels
12 July 2017
Reporter: Mark Dugdale

DSM copyright directive pushes on


The publisher’s right has moved one step closer to becoming law in the EU after two European Parliament committees signed off on the draft directive on copyright.

The European Parliament’s committees on culture and education and industry, research and energy passed Article 11 of the draft directive, first put forward last year to modernise EU copyright law, a number of amendments, including the removal of an exclusion for scientific publications.

Should the draft directive’s Article 11 pass the lead committee's vote in October and the scrutiny of the full European Parliament, press publishers will be able to charge licensing fees for links to—and the use of snippets from—their news stories in search services such as Google News.

The press publisher’s right, also known as the link tax and the neighbouring right for press publishers, will be enforceable for 20 years after publication.

European Publishers Council (EPC) executive director Angela Mills Wade commented: “The EPC welcomes the recognition by MEPs [members of European Parliament] that the neighbouring right for press publishers would help create a fairer digital ecosystem whereby consumers can access and enjoy our content 24/7 on multiple platforms and where tech companies and other businesses can use and distribute our content with permission and on mutually beneficially terms.

“The neighbouring right is crucial: in an era of fake news, publishers need to be economically viable to perform their essential role in society, providing eye-witness accounts, unearthing the truth, calling authorities to account and able to pay for quality investigative journalism.”

On the committees’ amendments, Mills Wade added: “We welcome the additional amendments adopted MEPs which put the press publishers more closely on a par with other neighbouring rightholders so they benefit from all the EU harmonised rights relevant to publishers for both online and print publications.

“Furthermore, in the wake of the scaremongering that readers will no longer be able to share links and articles for non-commercial purposes or post to social media, important amendments were adopted to clarify that this activity will continue as today perfectly legally.”

More Copyright news
The latest news from IPPro The Internet
Join Our Newsletter

Sign up today and never
miss the latest news or an issue again

Subscribe now
Radiohead sue Lana Del Rey for copyright infringement
8 January 2018 | New York | Reporter: Barney Dixon
Radiohead are suing Lana Del Rey for copyright infringement, claiming that the Del Rey’s 2017 song Get Free was similar to their 1992 song Creep
Glosfer and Gemmy to create blockchain copyright protection platform
4 January 2018 | Seoul | Reporter: Barney Dixon
Blockchain firm Glosfer has signed a memorandum of understanding with copyright protection company Gemmy to create a blockchain-based copyright protection platform
Dish Network sues IPTV providers
4 January 2018 | Maryland | Reporter: Barney Dixon
US satellite TV network Dish has sued two IPTV providers, claiming that they profit from the unlawful retransmission of Dish TV channels
Spotify sued for $1.6 billion over copyrighted works
3 January 2018 | California | Reporter: Barney Dixon
Spotify has been sued for $1.6 billion by Wixen Music Publishing, which represents artists including Tom Petty, Neil Young and the Beach Boys
Facebook slams infringing content in first half of 2017
19 December 2017 | California | Reporter: Barney Dixon
Facebook removed more than 2.5 million pieces of copyright infringing content across its Facebook and Instagram social media platforms in the first half of 2017, according to the company’s annual transparency report
APLA and French police take down piracy site
14 December 2017 | Bordeaux | Reporter: Barney Dixon
A joint operation between French police and the ALPA has resulted in the closure of piracy streaming website, artv.watch
PSNI, HMRC and FACT seize 50 illegal streaming devices
08 December 2017 | Belfast | Reporter: Barney Dixon
A joint operation between UK enforcement bodies has resulted in the seizure of 50 illegal streaming devices