California
15 March 2017
Reporter: Mark Dugdale
Videogame hacker could pay $8.5 million
Blizzard Entertainment has demanded more than $8.5 million in damages from a company that develops hacks for some of its most popular videogames.

Blizzard asked for the sum in a motion for default judgement against Germany-based Bossland on 13 March.

Germany-based Bossland’s controversial hacks and bots allow players to cheat their way to the top in popular franchises such as World of Warcraft and Overwatch. Blizzard claimed in a complaint filed in the US District Court for the Central District of California that these hacks violate the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Bossland, “an archetypal bad actor”, according to Blizzard, told the videogame developer’s counsel that it intended to default rather than defend its actions after failing to convince the court to drop the case due to a lack of jurisdiction.

Blizzard argued: “Bossland’s goal with respect to this purely strategic default is clear: it hopes that a default judgement issued by this court will be difficult to enforce in Germany, and that its foreign assets will go undisturbed.”

“Thus, Bossland apparently intends to continue ‘business as usual’, distributing its infringing products around the world, including in the US, with perceived impunity.”

The German company has accrued 42,818 violations of the DMCA, according to Blizzard, at a cost of $200 each. This means it should be ordered to pay a little over $8.5 million in damages, as well as costs.

Blizzard has pursued Bossland in Germany, with some success. The German Federal Court of Justice ruled in January that a bot for World of Warcraft violated anti-competition laws.

It has also reportedly filed cases against Bossland in the UK.

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