Massachusetts
13 February 2017
Reporter: Barney Dixon
EFF slams proposals for UDRP-style copyright infringement system
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has slammed the Domain Name Association’s (DNA) proposal for a third-party copyright infringement system, calling it “ill-conceived” and “the very epitome of shadow regulation”.

According to the DNA, the voluntary system works in a similar way to the UDRP for trademarks.

DNA’s proposal came as part of its Healthy Domains Initiative, which aims to encourage “sound stewardship of the internet namespace” through consultations with various industry players, including law enforcement authorities and content providers.

The other proposals included addressing online security abuse, enhancing child abuse mitigation systems and streamlining complaint handling from illegal or ‘rogue’ online pharmacies.

But the EFF warned: “Any voluntary, private dispute resolution system paid for by the complaining parties will be captured by copyright holders and become a privatised version of the failed internet censorship bills SOPA and PIPA.”

“The Healthy Domains Initiative proposal was written by a group of domain name companies. They include Donuts.”

“Donuts has taken many steps that serve the interests of major corporate trademark and copyright holders over those of other internet users.”

“These include a private agreement with the Motion Picture Association of America to suspend domain names on request based on accusations of copyright infringement, and a ‘Domain Protected Marks List Plus’ that gives brand owners the power to stop others from using common words and phrases in domain names—a degree of control that they don't get from either ICANN procedures or trademark law.”

Mason Cole, vice president at Donuts and chair of the Healthy Domains Initiative committee, said that the proposal would address “pervasive and systemic copyright infringement”.

According to the Healthy Domains Initiative committee, the system’s “legal construct must be sound”. It must accurately reflect applicable law, be flexible in the face of copyright laws varying among jurisdictions, ensure due process for respondents and that complaintants pay panel fees, and not allow registries or registrars to be named as parties.

More Copyright news
The latest news from IPPro The Internet
Join Our Newsletter

Sign up today and never
miss the latest news or an issue again

Subscribe now
Speakers call for India to unite against piracy
30 March 2017 | Mumbai | Reporter: Mark Dugdale
Technology could be leveraged to bring about meaningful and effective solutions with the help of copyright owners, heard attendees of FICCI FRAMES
Industry groups comment on copyright leadership bill
28 March 2017 | Washington DC | Reporter: Barney Dixon
The legislation has had mixed responses from the US Chamber of Commerce, Oracle and the Library Copyright Alliance
Copyright leadership role a target of reform
27 March 2017 | Washington DC | Reporter: Mark Dugdale
The House of Representatives judiciary committee introduced the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act on 23 March
Safe harbour reforms dropped from Australian bill
24 March 2017 | Canberra | Reporter: Barney Dixon
The reforms may have delayed passage of other important provisions
FilmOn X fails to get judicial support
23 March 2017 | California | Reporter: Barney Dixon
Classing the service as a ‘cable provider’ could “jeopardise” the values of the Copyright Act
Supreme Court rules in Star Athletica v Varsity Brands
23 March 2017 | Washington DC | Reporter: Barney Dixon
Ruling heralded as a “big step forward for clothing designers”
CJCH to spearhead anti-piracy HQ
22 March 2017 | Cardiff | Reporter: Barney Dixon
CJCH Solicitors is backed by £432,000 from the Welsh government